These 3 birds got a second chance at life, thanks to this local center

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These 3 birds got a second chance at life, thanks to this local center

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Submitted by Rebecca Jaramillo, Glen Helen Raptor Center
Nearly 200 birds from the Dayton area are brought into the Glen Helen Raptor Center rehab clinic every year. About 50 percent of those rescues are successfully released back into their habitats.

Fifty percent of birds rescued by the Glen Helen Raptor Center are successfully released back into the wild. 

These three birds might have seen the end of their wild and free days had it not been for the caring staff at the center. These are just a handful of the stories with happy endings.

Nearly 200 birds from the Dayton area are brought into the Glen Helen Raptor Center rehab clinic every year. About 50 percent of those rescues are successfully released back into their habitats. Submitted by Rebecca Jaramillo, Glen Helen Raptor Center

Rescued: April 3

Near death on the side of a Yellow Springs road and then onto the road to recovery, this Turkey Vulture was suffering from a long list of injuries when it found itself in the Raptor Center rehab clinic.

An unfortunate run-in with a vehicle resulted in wing trauma, leg trauma and severe neurological trauma. Luckily for this guy, Yellow Springs resident Pam Bellamy rushed him to the Raptor Center, where he was given medications and lots of rest. 

A couple weeks after the accident, the vulture was able to fly once again and was released into the wild on May 15. 

Nearly 200 birds from the Dayton area are brought into the Glen Helen Raptor Center rehab clinic every year. About 50 percent of those rescues are successfully released back into their habitats. Submitted by Rebecca Jaramillo, Glen Helen Raptor Center

Rescued: April 6

After a tumble out of a tree in New Carlisle, this Great Horned Owl was too young to safely return to his nest. 

The young owlet spent a week at the Raptor Center while staff worked on a makeshift nest made from a plastic laundry basket. 

On April 13, the owlet was put back in its original tree and was reportedly seen feeding from its parents after it was re-nested. 

Nearly 200 birds from the Dayton area are brought into the Glen Helen Raptor Center rehab clinic every year. About 50 percent of those rescues are successfully released back into their habitats. Submitted by Rebecca Jaramillo, Glen Helen Raptor Center

Rescued: January 8

Struggling and unable to fly, a large female Bald Eagle was seen around the Dayton Wellfield early this year. Attempts to capture the bird lasted a week until, finally, she was caught on the Huffman Dam and taken to Dr. Brown, the Center’s veterinarian clinic in Centerville.

X-rays discovered a fractured coricoid, a part of the shoulder blade in mammals, and it would be almost a month before she had enough strength to fly again.

On February 15, the Bald Eagle resumed her life in the wild at the Ceasar Creek Dam. 

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