This must-see ‘castle’ is just an hour’s drive from Dayton

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This must-see ‘castle’ is just an hour’s drive from Dayton

Yes, there’s a “castle” in Ohio.

It’s called Chateau Laroche, and it’s in Loveland, Ohio, and it’s about an hour away from downtown Dayton.

According to Atlas Obscura, the castle was “built by an eccentric medieval enthusiast” named Harry Andrews. 

The article goes on:

Harry built the entire castle himself, using 2,600 sacks of cement and 32,000 quart milk cartons, for forming concrete bricks, 54,000 five-gallon buckets of dirt, and 56,000 pail-fulls of stone. He also built a secret room into the castle that wasn’t discovered until it collapsed years after his death.

In a freak accident, Harry Andrews set himself ablaze while cooking in the castle and died two weeks later. Today, the castle is still run by the “Knights of the Golden Trail,” the youth organization established by Andrews. Unsurprisingly, it is said to be haunted.

According to Wikipedia, Andrews was a “Boy Scout troop leader, World War I veteran, and medievalist,” and took him more than 50 years to finish the castle:

For over fifty years, Andrews worked on his castle project. He pulled stones from the nearby Little Miami River, and when that supply was exhausted, molded bricks with cement and quart milk cartons.

When Andrews died in 1981 he willed the castle to his Boy Scout troop the Knights of the Golden Trail (KOGT). The Castle has been extensively upgraded and renovated in the years since Andrews' death and has been mostly completed by the KOGT.

The castle is located at 12075 Shore Dr., Loveland. Admission is $5 per person, and children ages 5 and under are free. 

Hours are 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. seven days a week, April through September. It is open on all holidays, except for Christmas.

For more information, visit lovelandcastle.com, visit the Facebook page, or call 513-683-4686.

A view of the Chateau Laroche in Loveland from its terraced gardens. The terraces allowed for growing food and medicinal plants in convenient, protected plots. FILE PHOTO / Jan Underwood JAN UNDERWOOD
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