Record shop owner Luke Tandy shares ideal ‘last meal’ in Dayton

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Record shop owner Luke Tandy shares ideal ‘last meal’ in Dayton

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The BLT toast at Corner Kitchen, 613 E. 5th St., in Dayton's Oregon District. Provided photo

For some people, music feeds their soul. That’s true for local record store owner Luke Tandy. 

Luke recently opened up Skeleton Dust Records in the new Fireblocks District of Downtown Dayton. Since he is an fan of eclectic music, Luke decided to open a store that reflects a wide variety of tunes, from rock to reggae, electronic to metal, Skeleton Dust Records will carry it on vinyl, cassette tape or CD.

Luke Tandy recently opened Skeleton Dust Records at 133 E. 3rd St., downtown Dayton. Tandy shared his ideal 'last meal' in Dayton with us. Contributed photo

“Even if you don’t find exactly what you’re looking for, you can be sure to walk away with something new and interesting,” he said.

So when Luke isn’t feeding his soul with experimental tunes and eclectic art, he’s gotta fill his stomach with something satisfying too. I sat down with Luke to find out what he likes to eat in Dayton, and should he have just one dish to end all dishes, which would he choose? 

His pick: a twist on a classic, the BLT toast at Corner Kitchen. With thick slices of Nueske’s smoked bacon, perfectly toasted challah bread, a spread of tomato jam and black pepper mayo.

“It’s a divine intersection of sweet and salty flavors, and soft and crunchy textures. You truly can’t understand how tasty bacon can be until you’ve had it in his context. Just give me a whole plate of it and I would be content to have it as my last meal,” Tandy said.

The BLT toast at Corner Kitchen, 613 E. 5th St., in Dayton's Oregon District. Provided photo

It’s Corner Kitchen’s quality food in an unpretentious atmosphere that Luke loves about Dayton. It’s affordable, yet eclectic with tons of art and music offerings to stimulate your mind, and lots of great dining options. But there’s only one small gripe about Dayton’s food scene: “Can someone explain to me why there is not a single Indian restaurant in the downtown area?!?!” 

I hear you on that, Luke. 

With long hours he put into getting his new record store open, I asked Luke what and where he likes to drink to unwind. As a beer drinker, Crafted and Cured is his favorite place to grab a pint. 

Crafted & Cured at 531 Wayne Ave. in Dayton hosted a "soft opening" on Wednesday, April 27, offering a peek at its 60 taps of craft beers and ciders, as well as bottled small-production wines. Beers are sold in sizes from 5-ounce tasting glasses to 64-ounce growlers. Cured meats are coming soon. Crafted & Cured is open from 3 p.m. to 9 p.m. daily. -- Mark Fisher Mark Fisher/Staff

“They have the most specialized menu of beer, offering mostly rare beers and styles that are not normally featured in other places,” he said. “It is an absolute destination if you consider yourself a craft beer nut.”

Variety is key for Luke. He seeks it in his drinks, his dining, his art and definitely his music. 

At Luke’s new record store Skeleton Dust Records, not only is there music from every genre, but also rotating shows of sound and visual art. In other words, something for everyone. 

Luke Tandy recently opened Skeleton Dust Records at 133 E. 3rd St., downtown Dayton. Tandy shared his ideal 'last meal' in Dayton with us. Contributed photo

And if his eclectic taste in food is any indication of his record collection, well then, Skeleton Dust Records might just be Dayton’s coolest new spot.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR: Tess is a restaurant professional, home-baker and downtown Dayton dweller. When she's not mixing drinks for restaurant patrons, she's drinking champagne, buying shoes, or writing her blog, Ciao Vella. You can read about her home recipes, party planning tips, and more at www.CiaoVellaBlog.com.

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