4 good reasons to go to Jewish Center’s Cultural Arts and Book Festival

Award-winning playwright Jack Fry celebrates the life and times of Albert Einstein with his one-man show “Einstein!” on Oct. 19 at Oakwood High School. CONTRIBUTED PHOTO

Combined ShapeCaption
Award-winning playwright Jack Fry celebrates the life and times of Albert Einstein with his one-man show “Einstein!” on Oct. 19 at Oakwood High School. CONTRIBUTED PHOTO

Health, Hollywood, the Holocaust, science and romance are among the compelling subjects of this year's Jewish Community Center of Greater Dayton's Cultural Arts and Book Festival. The annual event begins Thursday, Oct. 19, at Oakwood High School and continues through early December.

“We try to have something for everyone,” said Jane Hochstein, center director. “This year, you will see a little bit of everything from education to health, from a one-man show to an art exhibit. We have a large diverse committee with different interests and backgrounds who help to determine the lineup. The Jewish Book Council in New York holds an annual conference. Meryl Hattenbach, the Jewish Community Center’s Program Manager, attended this year. She had the opportunity to hear over 200 authors speak about their books and evaluate if the author is a fit for Dayton, who is the target audience, and is the book topic high interest?”

>> 12 books about Dayton or by Daytonians that you should read

REASONS TO GO

1. Einstein!

Award-winning playwright Jack Fry of Los Angeles kicks off the festival with his one-man show “Einstein!,” an intriguing look at the legendary scientist’s early years in Berlin as he struggles to prove his theory of relativity and prove his relevance as a father. “Einstein!” was selected as the encore winner from the 2016 Hollywood International Fringe Festival and was also chosen as one of the “Top Ten Shows to See” at the 2016 New York International Fringe Festival.

“(Fry’s) knowledge of Albert Einstein as well as his passion for the character come shining through his performance,” noted Elaine Smith, Director of Michigan’s Berman Center for the Performing Arts who previously hosted Fry. “This is a unique look into the life of young Albert Einstein that fascinated audiences and had people giving him a well-deserved standing ovation at the end.”

>> Winners of the 2017 Dayton Literary Peace Prize

Combined ShapeCaption
Rabbi Naomi Levy, seen on “The Oprah Winfrey Show” and “Today” among other programs, discusses her book “Einstein & The Rabbi: Searching for the Soul” on Oct. 30 at the Boonshoft Center for Jewish Culture and Education. CONTRIBUTED PHOTO

Rabbi Naomi Levy, seen on “The Oprah Winfrey Show” and “Today” among other programs, discusses her book “Einstein & The Rabbi: Searching for the Soul” on Oct. 30 at the Boonshoft Center for Jewish Culture and Education. CONTRIBUTED PHOTO

Combined ShapeCaption
Rabbi Naomi Levy, seen on “The Oprah Winfrey Show” and “Today” among other programs, discusses her book “Einstein & The Rabbi: Searching for the Soul” on Oct. 30 at the Boonshoft Center for Jewish Culture and Education. CONTRIBUTED PHOTO

2. Top Rabbi

Hochstein is particularly pleased to have so many highly respected authors in the mix such as in-demand Rabbi Naomi Levy.

“Rabbi Naomi Levy was named by Newsweek as one of the Top 50 Rabbis in America,” Hochstein said. “She’s appeared on ‘Oprah,’ ‘Today’ and NPR and was featured in Parade, Self, Time, and Good Housekeeping. She will be speaking about her book ‘Einstein and the Rabbi: Searching for the Soul,’ which is inspired by a poignant letter of Einstein’s about the human condition that we are all intimately connected.

Combined ShapeCaption
Pulitzer Prize winner Glenn Frankel will provide commentary on the Academy Award-winning classic “High Noon,” particularly the script being a parable about the Red Scare, on Nov. 15 at the Neon Movies. CONTRIBUTED PHOTO

Pulitzer Prize winner Glenn Frankel will provide commentary on the Academy Award-winning classic “High Noon,” particularly the script being a parable about the Red Scare, on Nov. 15 at the Neon Movies. CONTRIBUTED PHOTO

Combined ShapeCaption
Pulitzer Prize winner Glenn Frankel will provide commentary on the Academy Award-winning classic “High Noon,” particularly the script being a parable about the Red Scare, on Nov. 15 at the Neon Movies. CONTRIBUTED PHOTO

3. Pulitzer Prize winner

Pulitzer Prize-winner Glenn Frankel will reflect on the Academy Award-winning classic “High Noon: The Hollywood Blacklist and the Making of an American Classic.”

“We will be showing the film ‘High Noon’ and Frankel will enlighten us with the complex historical context of the movie,” Hochstein said.

4. Multiple venues

In addition, the festival will be held at multiple venues throughout the Miami Valley from Coco’s Bistro to the Neon Movies. Organizers regard the move as a vital effort to help broaden its base.

“We appreciate the opportunity to collaborate with various organizations and community venues,” Hochstein said. “This allows us to reach a wider audience. We are grateful to have ongoing relationships with Hospice of Dayton, the Washington-Centerville Public Library, Friends of the Washington-Centerville Library, the Wright Memorial Public Library, Crowne Plaza Dayton, and the Ohio Arts Council.”

“We have worked hard to bring many talented individuals and diverse programs to inspire the Dayton community as a whole through authors, art and theater,” added festival Chairperson Julie Bloom. “We are looking forward to seeing everyone exploring the events we’ve planned.”

>> 10 must-read books by Dayton authors

2017 JCC CULTURAL ARTS AND BOOK FESTIVAL SCHEDULE

Thursday, Oct. 19

“Einstein!”

7 p.m. Oakwood High School Auditorium, 1200 Far Hills Ave., Oakwood

$18 in advance/$25 at the door. 18 and under no charge.

Wednesday, Oct. 25

“The Power of Different” with author Dr. Gail Saltz

7 p.m. Wright Memorial Public Library, 1776 Far Hills Ave., Oakwood

No charge.

Monday, Oct. 30

“Einstein & The Rabbi: Searching for the Soul” with author Rabbi Naomi Levy

7 p.m. Boonshoft CJCE, 525 Versailles Drive, Centerville

$5 in advance/$8 at the door.

Wednesday, Nov. 1

“The Light We Lost” with author Jill Santopolo

6:30 p.m. Coco’s Bistro, 250 Warren St., Dayton

$30. RSVP required by Oct. 24. Strictly kosher meal is available upon request.

Thursday, Nov. 2

“The Light We Lost” Q&A with author Jill Santopolo

10 a.m. Washington-Centerville Library, 111 W. Spring Valley Rd., Centerville

No charge.

Wednesday, Nov. 8

Local Holocaust survivor Robert Kahn shares his memoir “The Hard Road of Dreams”

7 p.m. Stivers School for the Arts, 1313 E. Fifth St., Dayton

No charge.

Wednesday, Nov. 15

“High Noon: The Hollywood Blacklist and the Making of an American Classic” with Pulitzer Prize-winner Glenn Frankel

7:15 p.m. Neon Movies, 130 E. Fifth St., Dayton

$9.

Thursday, Nov. 16

“Extreme Measures: Finding a Better Path to the End of Life” with author Dr. Jessica Nutik Zitter

7 p.m. Boonshoft CJCE, 525 Versailles Drive, Centerville

$5 in advance/$8 at the door.

Tuesday, Dec. 5

“A Gastroenterologist’s Guide to Gut Health” with Dr. David Novick

7 p.m. Boonshoft CJCE, 525 Versailles Drive, Centerville

$5 in advance/$8 at the door.

Thursday, Dec. 7

“My Jewish Year: 18 Holidays, One Wondering Jew” with author Abigail Pogrebin

6:30 p.m. Boonshoft CJCE, 525 Versailles Drive, Centerville

No charge

HOW TO GET TICKETS

For tickets or more information, call the JCC at (937) 610-1555 or visit online at www.jewishdayton.org.

About the Author