Dayton Funk Museum’s grand opening is sold out -- but you can visit on Saturday

Credit: DaytonDailyNews

Dayton is considered the Land of Funk. Here is why. Video by Amelia Robinson

Credit: DaytonDailyNews

After years of planning, the Funk Music Hall of Fame and Exhibition Center is ready to get funked up.

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The center, located at 113 E. Third St. in downtown Dayton's Fire Blocks District, will have its grand opening from 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. Friday, Feb. 16 at the Dayton Metro Library, 215 E. Third St. in downtown Dayton.

Credit: DaytonDailyNews

The Funk Museum and Exhibition Center is now open. Video by Amelia Robinson

Credit: DaytonDailyNews

Due to overwhelming interest, the grand opening event is at capacity, and only those who have made reservations will be able to attend.

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If you didn’t make your reservations, don’t worry: you can always visit the new Funk Music Hall of Fame on Saturday, Feb. 17. The hours for that day will be 11 a.m. to 5 p.m., according to founder David Webb.

To make reservations for other times, call 937-837-4441.

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Photo inside of the Funk Museum and Exhibition Center in downtown Dayton. Photo: Amelia Robinson
Photo inside of the Funk Museum and Exhibition Center in downtown Dayton. Photo: Amelia Robinson

INSIDE THE MUSEUM 

Museum highlights include Dayton artist Delora Buford-Buchanan's mural "Mount Funk More" and exhibits on the Ohio Players, Heatwave, Zapp, WDAO FM radio and Sly & the Family Stone.

One of the original signs from the recently closed Gilly's Jazz in downtown Dayton is also in the museum. The club, owned by the late Jerry Gillotti, hosted several fundraising events for the museum.

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“(There are) so many highlights it’s hard to name them all,” Webb said.

The funk music genre put Dayton on the map as the Land of the Funk in the 1970s and ’80s, thanks to a stable of groups that included the Ohio Players, Steve Arrington’s Hall of Fame, Zapp, Faze-O, Heatwave, Sun, Slave and Lakeside.

Webb said he hopes the center becomes a historical destination for Dayton that pays homage to funk stars past and present, and educates the public about the history of a genre of music he’s loved most of his life.