3 things we learned about Dayton from school time capsules

The architects renderings of the new Wilbur Wright Junior High and Elementary School were found in the time capsule buried Aug. 21, 1926. PHOTO: HORACE DOZIER
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The architects renderings of the new Wilbur Wright Junior High and Elementary School were found in the time capsule buried Aug. 21, 1926. PHOTO: HORACE DOZIER

Dayton schools have a long history of burying time capsules when new buildings are constructed.

In the past few years, close to 30 have been opened, and their contents have been archived by Horace Dozier Sr., a 1968 Roosevelt graduate and owner of a company, Vtechgraphics, that specializes in digital preservation.

Here are a few things you would learn by looking at what's in the time capsules.

1. In the 1950s, Dayton tried to recruit teachers with a $3,550 salary. That's one of the many facts in a recruitment pamphlet buried at Hickorydale Elementary School in 1959.

2. Schools tried "tasting parties" to get students to try new foods. A photo from a 1950s pamphlet about preventing the common cold shows students trying raw broccoli.

3. The country was smaller when some of the schools were built. Students at Wilbur Wright Junior High and Elementary School included an American flag in a 1926 time capsule. It has only 48 stars.