Coronavirus: Fewer than 1,000 cases reported for first time in a week

People wait in line at the Clark County Combined Health District's free COVID-19 testing clinic at Perrin Woods Elementary School in Springfield Wednesday. BILL LACKEY/STAFF
Caption
People wait in line at the Clark County Combined Health District's free COVID-19 testing clinic at Perrin Woods Elementary School in Springfield Wednesday. BILL LACKEY/STAFF

Credit: Bill Lackey

Credit: Bill Lackey

The Ohio Department of Health has reported fewer than 1,000 new cases in the past 24 hours, the first time in a week the state has reported fewer than 1,000 new cases.

The ODH reported a total of 985 cases Sunday, the third lowest number of cases in the past 21 days. The current 21 day case average sits at 1,693 cases per day. Since the beginning of the pandemic, the state has reported 1,075,004 cases of coronavirus.

The Ohio Hospital Association reported that 1,095 people are currently hospitalized with COVID-19, with about one in 17 patients testing positive for the coronavirus. In the past week, coronavirus hospitalizations dropped by 12%. The ODH reported that 64 people have been hospitalized with COVID-19 in the past 24 hours.

While the overall number of lives lost to COVID-19 in the U.S. has eclipsed 575,000, deaths have plummeted to an average of about 670 per day from a peak of around 3,400 in mid-January.

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Thirty-nine percent of the nation’s adult population has been fully vaccinated, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Over 55% of adults have received at least one dose, up from 30% a month ago.

In Ohio, 4,715,308 people have had at least one dose of the vaccine, bringing the partially vaccinated population to 40.34% of the population. The ODH reported that 23,203 people have completed their vaccine dose in the past 24 hours, bringing those with a completed vaccine dose to 3,856,309 people, or just under 33% of the state’s population.

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