Coronavirus: State case average drops below 300

Members of Montgomery County Public Health and the Ohio National Guard help with pop-up testing Tuesday at Kettering Fields, 444 North Bend Blvd. Results from the latest coronavirus pop-up testing site are expected in a more timely manner and results are accessible online to patients, following a switch to a new laboratory. JIM NOELKER/STAFF

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Members of Montgomery County Public Health and the Ohio National Guard help with pop-up testing Tuesday at Kettering Fields, 444 North Bend Blvd. Results from the latest coronavirus pop-up testing site are expected in a more timely manner and results are accessible online to patients, following a switch to a new laboratory. JIM NOELKER/STAFF

The state’s coronavirus daily case average dropped to 294 cases per day, the Ohio Department of Health reported Saturday. In the past 24 hours, the state reported 254 new cases.

For the past three days, the state has reported fewer than 300 cases in a day. The highest number of new cases in the past 21 days was 426 cases, which was reported June 8, the ODH reported. The state has not reported more than 400 cases since then.

In the past 24 hours, the ODH reported that 24 people were hospitalized. Currently, 296 people are hospitalized, the Ohio Hospital Association reported. In the past seven days, hospitalizations have dropped by 5 percent.

ExploreHeart reaction probed as possible rare vaccine link in teens

Last week, Ohio health officials discussed heart inflammation that was reportedly caused by the COVID-19 vaccine.

Myocarditis can reduce the heart’s ability to pump, causing fatigue, chest pains and shortness of breath, said Ohio Department of Health Chief Medical Officer Bruce Vanderhoff.

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices met Wednesday to discuss a possible connection between the COVID-19 vaccine and cases of myocarditis in younger people.

“It’s now very clear that this is an extremely rare side effect that only affects a very small number of people following vaccination,” Vanderhoff said. “Most cases are mild, and the individuals recover often on their own or with minimal treatment.”

Simon Lee, a pediatric cardiologist at The Heart Center at Nationwide Children’s Hospital, said symptoms can range from mild to severe, with patients sometimes being admitted to the hospital to monitor inflammation and to make sure the patient doesn’t develop a severe case.

While myocarditis can be caused by multiple things, COVID-19 vaccine-related cases appear to be mild and are resolved without treatment, Lee said.

The CDC also determined that the heart risks due to COVID infections can often be more severe, Vanderhoff said.

“The benefits of these COVID-19 vaccines clearly outweigh the risks,” he said. “For anyone, the risks of COVID-19 are great and can include hospitalizations and death. In fact, 2,767 COVID-19 deaths have been reported among people aged 12-29 years with 316 of those deaths having been reported just since April 1.”

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