200 new apartments downtown? It’s one option for former newspaper site

Credit: DaytonDailyNews

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The Dayton Daily News building, a long-time centerpiece of the community at the corner of Fourth and Ludlow Streets, is a stunning example of architectural elegance.

Credit: DaytonDailyNews

New retail, streetscaping, amenities and up to 200 new housing units are just some of the ideas development firms have for the former Dayton Daily News property downtown.

Three groups are vying to redevelop the mostly vacant 1.9 acre site along the 100 block of West Fourth Street, between South Ludlow and South Wilkinson streets.

Their development proposals — submitted to the city of Dayton and obtained by this newspaper through a public records request — reveal differing views on what uses best fit the area and have the greatest potential to help reactivate that section of downtown.

RELATED: Arcade developers, 2 others want to transform newspaper site

Here are the proposals for the land located just west of — and across the street from — the Dayton Arcade.

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A rendering of what new housing could look like at South Ludlow and West Fourth Street. This is from Miller-Valentine Group and Cross Street Partners’ proposal. CONTRIBUTED

A rendering of what new housing could look like at South Ludlow and West Fourth Street. This is from Miller-Valentine Group and Cross Street Partners’ proposal. CONTRIBUTED

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A rendering of what new housing could look like at South Ludlow and West Fourth Street. This is from Miller-Valentine Group and Cross Street Partners’ proposal. CONTRIBUTED

Fits with the Dayton Arcade

Miller-Valentine Group and Cross Street Partners have teamed up for the Dayton Arcade project and are working on a $65 million plan to convert the complex into artist housing, creative and maker spaces, restaurants and more.

The groups are still trying to secure financing for the initial phases of the massive rehab project.

But they have talked about how the arcade’s revival will jump start that part of downtown, and they say redeveloping the old newspaper site will better connect Main Street and Sinclair Community College.

The partners propose creating 160 to 200 market rate housing units and student apartments where the newspaper used to be, at 45 S. Ludlow St. They want to build a three- to five-story building that mirrors the heights and lines of the arcade’s buildings and incorporates the 1908 historic Dayton Daily News building.

The newer portions of the Dayton Daily News building were demolished as part of a project to create new housing that ultimately unraveled. The historic structure at the corner of Ludlow and Fourth streets remains.

They also propose to create ground-floor retail and spaces possibly for food or a coffee shop. They also want below-grade and screened parking, as well as an interior courtyard.

The historic newspaper building would be great for retail and amenities or office space upstairs, according to their proposal. The development would support a walkable and vibrant Ludlow corridor, they said.

RELATED: City now plans to redevelop most of former Dayton Daily site

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An artist rendering of the Annex Group’s $24 million project at Indiana State University. CONTRIBUTED

An artist rendering of the Annex Group’s $24 million project at Indiana State University. CONTRIBUTED

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An artist rendering of the Annex Group’s $24 million project at Indiana State University. CONTRIBUTED

A luxurious touch

Indianapolis firm Flaherty & Collins Properties says it wants to make the old newspaper site a mixed-use apartment development with luxury amenities.

The firm proposes a five-story building offering 180 apartment units.

There would be 108 studios and one-bedroom apartments. The building would have 72 two-bedroom units.

Incorporating the historic newspaper building into the project could increase the total number of units to 195.

The firm says it wants to build small units (900 square feet on average) that are efficient and equipped with the latest technology and finishes.

The firm says it seeks to attract tenants who are extremely active, social and want to be near entertainment options and most desire onsite amenities and technological features.

The firm says it specializes in first-class, high density, mixed-use developments. It says the average salary of its residents is more than $100,000.

The firm also proposes to create 4,000 square feet of retail space and 7,000 square feet of “storefront” amenity space.

The amenity space would have a resort-style pool, state-of-the-art fitness center, Internet cafe, game room, business center, and leasing office.

The development would have a courtyard, decorative lighting, pet spa, area for pet owners and an aqua lounge.

MORE: Dayton Arcade: Revival plan predicts hundreds of jobs

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A photo of the Ninety7Fifty on the Park project, developed by Flaherty & Collins developed. Flaherty & Collins is behind a significant number of luxury developments. CONTRIBUTED

A photo of the Ninety7Fifty on the Park project, developed by Flaherty & Collins developed. Flaherty & Collins is behind a significant number of luxury developments. CONTRIBUTED

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A photo of the Ninety7Fifty on the Park project, developed by Flaherty & Collins developed. Flaherty & Collins is behind a significant number of luxury developments. CONTRIBUTED

Affordable housing for students

Indianapolis firm the Annex Group specializes in student housing projects and sees much promise in the newspaper site considering it is just blocks from Sinclair Community College. The firm says putting affordable housing close to campus would draw students who want to live downtown.

The Annex proposes 114 apartments — affordable and market-rate — in a new five-story building.

The 172,000-square-foot structure would be U-shaped, with building facades along Ludlow, Fourth and Wilkinson streets.

The apartments would be located on the ground level along Fourth and Wilkinson streets and on the upper levels of sections of building that face Ludlow, Fourth and Wilkinson streets.

The ground-floor units would have walk-up style entryways, and the center part of the development would be used for at-grade parking.

The group wants to create 5,000 square feet of new retail space, which likely will be restaurants or dining options.

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