Man accused of throwing boy from Mall of America balcony pleads guilty

Credit: DaytonDailyNews

Caption
Boy Thrown from Third-Floor Balcony of Mall of America Making "Small Steps" Towards Recovery

Credit: DaytonDailyNews

A Minneapolis man who was accused of throwing a 5-year-old boy over a third-floor balcony in the Mall of America has pleaded guilty Tuesday in court.

KSTP reported that 24-year-old Emmanuel Aranda was charged with attempted premeditated first-degree murder.

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The Associated Press reported that Aranda admitted his guilt as part of a plea deal. The deal means prosecutors won't pursue an aggravated circumstances component to the charge, which could have led to another year in prison.

This undated photo provided by the Bloomington, Minn., Police Department, shows Emmanuel Deshawn Aranda, who was arrested in connection with an incident at the Mall of America where a 5-year-old boy plummeted three floors from a balcony on Friday, April 12, 2019.
Caption
This undated photo provided by the Bloomington, Minn., Police Department, shows Emmanuel Deshawn Aranda, who was arrested in connection with an incident at the Mall of America where a 5-year-old boy plummeted three floors from a balcony on Friday, April 12, 2019.

Credit: Bloomington Police Department via AP

Credit: Bloomington Police Department via AP

On April 12, the 5-year-old boy was shopping with his mother when Aranda picked the boy up and threw him over the railing.

Related: Boy thrown from Mall of America balcony making 'small steps' toward healing

Aranda said at a previous court appearance that he was angry after being rejected by women at the mall for years, leading him to attack 5-year-old. He told authorities he went to the mall "looking for someone to kill," and chose Landen Hoffman at random.

Related: Police: Man who threw 5-year-old from third floor of Mall of America intended to kill someone

Landen suffered broken arms and legs and had head trauma, but the pastor of his family's church said he had no sign of permanent damage or brain swelling. A GoFundMe page created to help with medical costs raised more than $1 million.

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