Dayton program for rehabbing homes facing a major backlog

Greg Soete stands outside his home on Drummer Avenue in the Necombs Plain neighborhood in east Dayton. Soete applied for two parcels through Lot Links in mid-2016 to turn into a side yard and garden but is still waiting for the properties to be transferred to him. CORNELIUS FROLIK / STAFF
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Greg Soete stands outside his home on Drummer Avenue in the Necombs Plain neighborhood in east Dayton. Soete applied for two parcels through Lot Links in mid-2016 to turn into a side yard and garden but is still waiting for the properties to be transferred to him. CORNELIUS FROLIK / STAFF

The Dayton Lot Links program, which allows residents to pay a couple thousand dollars to acquire abandoned and tax-delinquent properties to fix-up or improve after the back taxes are wiped away, is facing a major backlog.

The program has transferred just 38 properties this year, well below the 148 properties from last year.

Currently, about 300 to 400 applications are in the system, and applicants are having to wait 18 to 24 months to get ownership of the properties, said Brian Inderrieden, acting director of Dayton’s department of planning and community development.

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