Local newspaper prints final issue after 50 years in business

ARCHIVED PHOTO:Don Bruce, right, a Wright State University graduate student and opinions editor of the Guardian, looks over the student newspaper with Josh Sweigart, left, news editor, and Alf Butler, the editor-in-chief. Bruce sees himself leaving Ohio to pursue a career.
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ARCHIVED PHOTO:Don Bruce, right, a Wright State University graduate student and opinions editor of the Guardian, looks over the student newspaper with Josh Sweigart, left, news editor, and Alf Butler, the editor-in-chief. Bruce sees himself leaving Ohio to pursue a career.

Credit: Chris Stewart

Credit: Chris Stewart

A local newspaper started five decades ago has printed its last issue.

The Guardian, Wright State University's student-run newspaper, will be digital-only going forward, said Kristin Baughman, the newspaper's new editor-in-chief.

“It allows us to be more timely,” she said. “It really allows us to keep up with campus more.”

The move to go digital-only was solely a student call and will take effect in August, Baughman said.

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The newspaper published its last print edition on April 28. That edition remains on newsstands.

The decision to go digital-only was in part a result of changing times, Baughman said.

“We looked at how we consume media,” she added. “It is really the best way to get out information.”

The Guardian was published once a week. It employs 11 students in paid positions.

Wright State has about 18,000 students.  Baughman said she didn’t have the Guardian’s circulation numbers readily available.

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22 April 09. Andy Sedlak, , a sports writer with the Wright State University Guardian, the campus newspaper, researches a story while in the Guardian newsroom.

Credit: Ron Alvey

22 April 09. Andy Sedlak, , a sports writer with the Wright State University Guardian, the campus newspaper, researches a story while in the Guardian newsroom.
Caption
22 April 09. Andy Sedlak, , a sports writer with the Wright State University Guardian, the campus newspaper, researches a story while in the Guardian newsroom.

Credit: Ron Alvey

Credit: Ron Alvey

Several college students have changed the way they disseminate the news in recent years.

The Post, Ohio University's student-run newspaper, announced in 2016 that it would publish a print edition once a week while classes were in session instead of five days a week.

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It intended to focus on making its website "the main vehicle for breaking news," the Columbus Dispatch said.

The Lantern at Ohio State University also made changes to its print strategy, according to the Dispatch.

Once printed five days a week, it now publishes a print edition three days a week.

We reached out to editors of other Dayton area college newspapers and are awaiting responses.

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ARCHIVED PHOTO: Alan Hieber, the Wright State Guardian feature writer/sports writer who is wheelchair bound with Duchene muscular dystrophy and is covering Saturday’s Air Force Marathon for his student newspaper. He normally covers things on campus, especially sports. He does this because he likes sports and writing and telling people’s stories and not because he sees this as a stepping stone to a more prominent career in the future…His future is in jeopardy. ..The normal life expectancy for Duchene muscular dystrophy (of which there is no cure) is 25. …He is 21. Here, Hieber interviews Jason Brosseau who won the 2015 Air Force Marathon. TY GREENLEES / STAFF

ARCHIVED PHOTO: Alan Hieber, the Wright State Guardian feature writer/sports writer who is wheelchair bound with Duchene muscular dystrophy and is covering Saturday’s Air Force Marathon for his student newspaper. He normally covers things on campus, especially sports. He does this because he likes sports and writing and telling people’s stories and not because he sees this as a stepping stone to a more prominent career in the future…His future is in jeopardy. ..The normal life expectancy for Duchene muscular dystrophy (of which there is no cure) is 25. …He is 21.  Here, Hieber interviews Jason Brosseau who won the 2015 Air Force Marathon.  TY GREENLEES / STAFF
Caption
ARCHIVED PHOTO: Alan Hieber, the Wright State Guardian feature writer/sports writer who is wheelchair bound with Duchene muscular dystrophy and is covering Saturday’s Air Force Marathon for his student newspaper. He normally covers things on campus, especially sports. He does this because he likes sports and writing and telling people’s stories and not because he sees this as a stepping stone to a more prominent career in the future…His future is in jeopardy. ..The normal life expectancy for Duchene muscular dystrophy (of which there is no cure) is 25. …He is 21. Here, Hieber interviews Jason Brosseau who won the 2015 Air Force Marathon. TY GREENLEES / STAFF

The Flyer News, the student-run newspaper at the University of Dayton, appointed both a print and online editor at the end of the semester as it has done in the past.

The Gold Torch, the student newspaper at Central State University, printed its last story several years ago. Its last online stories were published in 2009.

Baughman said the move to make the Guardian online-only constitutes a big change.

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Staffers plan to work with the university’s communications department and marketing students to come up with a social media strategy, she said.

A PDF version of the newspaper will be posted each week.

>> Wright State will lay off around 71 employees, leave 107 jobs vacant

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22 April 09. Ryan Hehr, a news writer with the Wright State University Guardian, the campus newspaper, researches a story while in the Guardian newsroom.

Credit: Ron Alvey

22 April 09. Ryan Hehr, a news writer with the Wright State University Guardian, the campus newspaper, researches a story while in the Guardian newsroom.
Caption
22 April 09. Ryan Hehr, a news writer with the Wright State University Guardian, the campus newspaper, researches a story while in the Guardian newsroom.

Credit: Ron Alvey

Credit: Ron Alvey

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