‘The end of the world is happening. I have to have booze in the house’

Governor Mike DeWine’s order to close bars and restaurants led to an immediate surge of business at area liquor stores.

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Governor Mike DeWine’s order to close bars and restaurants led to an immediate surge of business at area liquor stores.

Governor Mike DeWine’s order to close bars and restaurants led to an immediate surge of business at area liquor stores.

“Until bars and restaurants are allowed to go back, there’s only one place to drink and that’s at home,” said Arrow Wine owner Mif Frank on Sunday.

ExploreState orders restaurants, bars to close

The line at Arrow Wine & Spirits on Far Hills Avenue in Kettering stretched from the cash registers to the back of the store at around 4:30 p.m. Sunday, right after the governor made the announcement.

“The end of the world is happening. I have to have booze in the house,” remarked a woman in a face mask who wouldn’t give her name.

Kim Yost walked out with an armful of Jim Beam. He said he heard other states had a liquor shortage, though no such thing has been reported. Yost said he just got off work from a cooking shift at Meadowlark restaurant, where employees will be impacted by the dine-in closure.

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“It feels apocalyptic. Everyone is freaking out about it,” he said.

He said it’s not clear how or whether he’ll get paid while the store is closed. “We’ll see,” he said.

Robert Jones stood outside of Arrow Wine waiting for a friend. He said he’s disappointed he won’t be able to have a few beers at the Shroyer Inn anytime soon. But he expects the order will be a massive boon to food delivery services like DoorDash and Grubhub.

“It’s inconvenient, but I understand their position,” he said of the governor’s decision.

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