Winning that Olympic medal is amazing, but it'll cost you

RIO DE JANERIO, BRAZIL - AUGUST 13: Michael Phelps (2nd L) of the USA poses with his team-mates as his team won gold medal after the Men's 4 x 100m Medley Relay swimming Final of the Rio 2016 Olympic Games at the Olympic Aquatics Stadium in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil on on August 13, 2016. (Photo by Salih Zeki Fazlioglu/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)
Caption
RIO DE JANERIO, BRAZIL - AUGUST 13: Michael Phelps (2nd L) of the USA poses with his team-mates as his team won gold medal after the Men's 4 x 100m Medley Relay swimming Final of the Rio 2016 Olympic Games at the Olympic Aquatics Stadium in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil on on August 13, 2016. (Photo by Salih Zeki Fazlioglu/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)

Credit: Anadolu Agency

Credit: Anadolu Agency

Ah, Olympic medals. They're shiny, meaningful and apparently expensive as hell for the athletes.

For every medal an American athlete wins, the U.S. Olympic Committee drops some cash. For every gold, you get $25,000. For every silver, $15,000. And for every bronze, you get $10,000.

But those big Olympian smiles probably change just a bit when the victors realize Uncle Sam is coming.

According to Americans for Tax Reform, Olympians could pay as much as $9,900 for gold, $5,940 for silver or $3,960 for bronze. PER MEDAL.

But luckily, a bill in the House right now would make medals and prize money tax exempt. It's already passed the Senate.