Trump budget proposal includes 25 percent cut to food stamps: report

WASHINGTON, DC - MAY 18:  U.S. President Donald Trump delivers remarks during a joint news conference with Colombian President Juan Manuel Santos at the White House May 18, 2017 in Washington, DC. The Trump administration has said it wants to slash foreign aide and Santos will most likely seek a renewal of $450 million dollars from the U.S. that supports the peace accord between the Columbian government at the Revolutionary Armed Forces (FARC).  (Photo by Mark Wilson/Getty Images)
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WASHINGTON, DC - MAY 18: U.S. President Donald Trump delivers remarks during a joint news conference with Colombian President Juan Manuel Santos at the White House May 18, 2017 in Washington, DC. The Trump administration has said it wants to slash foreign aide and Santos will most likely seek a renewal of $450 million dollars from the U.S. that supports the peace accord between the Columbian government at the Revolutionary Armed Forces (FARC). (Photo by Mark Wilson/Getty Images)

Credit: Mark Wilson

Credit: Mark Wilson

President Donald Trump will propose a more than 25 percent cut to food stamp funding in a budget proposal expected Tuesday, according to a report.

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The president will propose $193 billion worth of cuts over the next decade from the Supplemental Nutritional Assistance Program, formerly known as the food stamp program, The Associated Press reported, citing talking points circulated by the White House.

The program currently serves about 42 million people, according to numbers released in February by the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

The cuts would drive millions of people off food stamps through changes in eligibility guidelines and the implementation of additional work requirements, according to The AP.

SNAP's current work requirement is aimed at cutting benefits to the "most able-bodied adults who don't have children," The Washington Post reported.

About 44 million people spread across 21 million households got benefits through SNAP last year, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture. Officials said participants got an average of $125 per month, while households got an average of $258. The program cost $70.9 billion in 2016.

Trump’s budget proposal is also expected to include large cuts to Medicaid, federal employee pensions, welfare benefits and farm subsidies.

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