Kids in Colorado can now legally sell lemonade without business licenses

Colorado's governor has signed a bill that prohibits local municipalities from requiring business licenses for kids operating lemonade stands.

Combined ShapeCaption
Colorado's governor has signed a bill that prohibits local municipalities from requiring business licenses for kids operating lemonade stands.

Let the lemonade flow! Kids in Colorado now don’t have to pay for government bureaucracy just to sell a cup of lemonade in their neighborhoods.

Gov. Jared Polis made it official that local governments can no longer require anyone under the age of 18 to get a business license for small and occasional businesses, the Denver Post reported.

Fans of the childhood rite of passage can lift a glass of lemonade to the Guffey boys - Ben, 7, William, 5, and Jonathan, 3, the newspaper reported.

The three brothers' stand was shut down last year when police told them they needed not one but three permits to operate the stand, The Wall Street Journal reported.

>> Read more trending news

The city council in Denver changed its collective mind after the boys' business was closed, but state lawmakers decided protection for all young entrepreneurs was needed in their state, according to the Post.

Some changes may be needed on the local level to make sure the new law is being adhered to, but local officials do get to say where the stands can be set up, the Post reported.

Polis is no stranger to setting up a childhood stand. He sold tomatoes when he was young.

He hopes the bill he signed allows more children the chance to get into business.

About the Author