Massive rock fall kills 1, injures another at Yosemite

This Jan. 14, 2015 file photo shows El Capitan in Yosemite National Park, Calif. Officials at Yosemite say a chunk of rock broke off El Capitan on Wednesday, Sept. 27, 2017, along one of the world's most famously scaled routes at the height of climbing season. (AP Photo/Ben Margot, File)
Caption
This Jan. 14, 2015 file photo shows El Capitan in Yosemite National Park, Calif. Officials at Yosemite say a chunk of rock broke off El Capitan on Wednesday, Sept. 27, 2017, along one of the world's most famously scaled routes at the height of climbing season. (AP Photo/Ben Margot, File)

Credit: Ben Margot

Credit: Ben Margot

A massive chunk of rock fell from the face of the El Capitan granite monolith in Yosemite National Park on Wednesday afternoon, killing one person and injuring at least one other.

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Officials said a chunk of rock fell just before 2 p.m. near the park's popular Waterfall route, on the east buttress of El Capitan. Authorities did not immediately say how big the chunk of rock was, although witnesses described it as "the size of an apartment building" to The Associated Press.

A rockfall of undetermined size occurred on El Capitan at about 1:55 pm today. The release point appears to be near the ...

Posted by Yosemite National Park on Wednesday, September 27, 2017

"I saw a piece of rock, white granite the size of an apartment building, at least 100 feet by 100 feet, suddenly just come peeling off the wall with no warning," Canadian climber Peter Zabrok, 57, told the AP. He said he was scaling El Capitan above the site of the rock fall when the incident happened.

Officials did not identify the person who was killed or the person who was injured. It was not immediately clear whether they were tourists or climbers. Park ranger Scott Gediman told the AP that at least 30 climbers were on the wall when the rock fell.

The injured person was taken to a hospital outside the park for treatment.

The rock fall comes as visitors flock to the park for climbing season, according to the National Parks Service.

The park remained open despite the incident.

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