Texas civil court judge accidentally resigns

A Texas civil judge's plans to run for the state supreme court triggered a clause in the state constitution.

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A Texas civil judge's plans to run for the state supreme court triggered a clause in the state constitution.

A Texas judge accidentally resigned his position, thanks to a clause in the state constitution.

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Bill McLeod, judge for Harris County Civil Court at Law Number Four, won election in November. But when he shared plans to run for the state Supreme Court, he triggered a clause in the Texas state constitution that required he resign his post, KHOU reported.

McLeod shared online future plans to run for the state supreme court with the television station. According to Article 16, Section 65, Subsection B of the Texas state constitution, if a judge announces a candidacy for any other office -- when the unexpired term of the current office is more than one year, 30 days -- "It will constitute an automatic resignation of the office then held."

The state constitution also allows county commissioners the authority to keep McLeod in his post until a special election is held, KHOU reported.

Harris County Attorney Vince Ryan’s office will present the issue to county commissioners when they meet Monday, according to the television station.

McLeod declined to be interviewed, citing concerns over ethics violations.

Kandice Webber is part of a social media push to keep McLeod at his post."Our judges are human," Webber told KHOU. "This would not be the first time that a judge has made a mistake. I would beg the court to leave him where he is. This is where Houstonians want him. This is where Harris County wants him, and we made that very loud and clear at the ballot."

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