Kung Fu Noodle now open in former Colony Club space.

Why customers are going crazy for noodle destination

One of the restaurants that opened in 2019 that is still getting a lot of attention is famous for its menu of fresh, hand-pulled noodles.

Kung Fu Noodle had a soft open in mid-January and has been quickly growing a steady following of fans. The restaurant had a “formal opening” on March 14 and is one worth a visit if you haven’t been there yet.

>> Kung Fu Noodle now open in Kettering

A restaurant that specializes in noodle dishes from northern China is now open at 2801 S. Dixie Drive in Kettering. Kung Fu Noodle is located on the north end of a building that once held the Colony Club. Kung Fu Noodle opened “softly” in mid-January and is still serving a “trial operation menu,” with a permanent menu in the works in the weeks ahead. But even the trial menu is extensive, featuring appetizers such as roasted lamb skewer, dumplings, pot stickers and “Dandan Noodle,” consisting of thin vermicelli-style noodles with stir-fried ground pork, topped with spicy garlic sauce and green onion. MARK FISHER / STAFF PHOTO

The very modest west Kettering restaurant that seats just 22, is housed in a location that doesn’t begin to indicate the delicious delights that lie inside.

It has the Happy Asian food market on one side and Capri Lanes on the other and is a place you would most certainly drive by without a passing glance if you weren’t aware of the glorious, springy noodles awaiting on the other side of the door. When you finally walk through its doors, the decor is simple and unimpressive. Just know that the noodles and dumplings are vibrant and juicy.

>> The best noodle dishes around town

A restaurant that specializes in noodle dishes from northern China is now open at 2801 S. Dixie Drive in Kettering. Kung Fu Noodle is located on the north end of a building that once held the Colony Club. Kung Fu Noodle opened “softly” in mid-January and is still serving a “trial operation menu,” with a permanent menu in the works in the weeks ahead. But even the trial menu is extensive, featuring appetizers such as roasted lamb skewer, dumplings, pot stickers and “Dandan Noodle,” consisting of thin vermicelli-style noodles with stir-fried ground pork, topped with spicy garlic sauce and green onion. MARK FISHER / STAFF PHOTO

The restaurant specializes in handmade Lanzhou noodles, full of flavor and history with origins that date back to China’s Tang Dynasty more than 2,000 years ago. Lanzhou, the capital of the Gansu province in northwest China, is the namesake for one of China’s most popular noodle dishes and one of the best on the menu at Kung Fu Noodle.

The classic aromatic Lanzhou beef noodle soup has a pile of hand-stretched noodles topped with braised beef, sliced white radish, green garlic and cilantro ($11.95 for a regular portion, $14.95 for the large). It’s warm, tangy, satisfyingly simple and sure to become a favorite.

  

The authentic goodness continues throughout the menu.

The braised beef noodle soup ($11.95, $14.95) is savory, rich and tender with chunks of braised beef, carrot and tomato in a full-flavored seasoned broth.

Sausage stir-fried noodles ($9.95 for lunch, $12.95 for dinner) are filling and satisfying thanks to a pile of noodles mixed with zucchini squash, carrots, onions, eggs and sausage. You can get chicken, pork or vegetable stir fried noodles if sausage isn’t for you.

>> Where to find the best Chinese food in Dayton

The restaurant’s specialties include steamed cold noodles ($8 with ground pork added for an additional $1), Kung Fu mung bean noodle ($6.50), thin vermicelli noodle in chicken broth ($6.50), thick vermicelli noodles in chicken broth ($8) a fantastic chicken broth wonton soup ($10.95) and, the restaurant’s delightful Dan Dan noodles ($6.50), which is my favorite new obsession dish. These kicky noodles mixed with fine ground pork, pickled long string beans, sesame paste and spicy garlic sauce are totally wonderful and addictive.

The Dan Dan noodles at Kung Fu Noodles feature kicky noodles mixed with fine ground pork, pickled long string beans, sesame paste and spicy garlic sauce. CONTRIBUTED/ALEXIS LARSEN
Photo: Contributing Writer

I ate this dish so quickly I found myself slurping uncontrollably during moments of clarity before I was lured back in with reckless abandon.

Across the board everything I have tried so far featured a good portion that was priced right, and most importantly, tasted authentically delicious.

Order pot stickers to start ($5.50) that can give you a sense of the magic that is about to happen with the main course is served. Any that are leftover when your soup is served can be dunked into the broth.

Consider finishing with an order of the Chinese donuts ($2) if your sweet tooth is in the mood.

The menu isn’t massive, but it doesn’t need to be. It’s been edited to execute well on what it offers.

It’s a simple restaurant with simple dishes that should not be underestimated. This is a spot that satisfies.

X