BEAT THE BLUES: How to quash stay-at-home boredom when going outside is not an option

How to make the most of time at home when the outdoors is not an option
How to make the most of time at home when the outdoors is not an option

Credit: Staff

Credit: Staff

The COVID-19 pandemic is not letting up as we head into the cold, wetter months of winter, bringing new challenges and obstacles.

Although 2020 has not been particularly kind, there were things that consistently brought many people joy throughout the hard times. One was simply getting outside for fresh air. People gained a new appreciation for their local parks, discovered new hiking trails, and when needing a quick refresher while quarantining at home, learned the value of a stroll through the neighborhood.

As the region experiences the seasons’ first snowy days, or days where the temperature makes a visit to the park sound anything but relaxing, it’s important to remember healthy and creative ways to beat the stay-at-home boredom.

Here are some activities to turn to when the weather’s got you down:

The Dayton Art Institute debuted its new LED lighting system on Wednesday, November 25, 2020. Designed by Scenic Solutions of West Carrolton, the new lighting will illuminate the building's exterior for the holidays, community and special events. The Dayton Power & Light Foundation provided a Signature Grant to make the project a reality. Also featured is the recently restored Grand Staircase. TOM GILLIAM/CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER
The Dayton Art Institute debuted its new LED lighting system on Wednesday, November 25, 2020. Designed by Scenic Solutions of West Carrolton, the new lighting will illuminate the building's exterior for the holidays, community and special events. The Dayton Power & Light Foundation provided a Signature Grant to make the project a reality. Also featured is the recently restored Grand Staircase. TOM GILLIAM/CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER

Credit: Tom Gilliam

Credit: Tom Gilliam

Explore the Dayton Art Institute from your living room

In response to the pandemic, the Dayton Art Institute has made digital resources available to the public so they can “explore #DaytonArtAtHome.”

Available to DAI members and non-members alike, theses digital resources offer multiple ways to take in the DAI like never before. For example, the PNC Tiny Thursdays at Home digital resource currently features art videos for kids, narrated by some of DAI’s very own museum guides.

ExploreLocal arts organizations receive CARES Act grants to help ease pandemic’s impact

The videos are usually short, three to five minutes in length, and are a perfect way to supplement art into a student’s day while learning remotely at home.

More interactive digital resources include Object of the Month at Home, Draw from the Collection at-home projects and more.

The digital resources offer educational fun to all ages. In fact, Michael Roediger, DAI’s CEO, said the digital resources have been such a hit with families during the pandemic that the museum is likely to make the content available indefinitely.

There’s nothing like experiencing art in-person, but for now, these resources are a great substitute. Explore all the museum’s digital resources at www.daytonartinstitute.org.

Dayton resident Wanda Lacy walks miles everyday in her South Park neighborhood home to stay active during quarantine. Staff photo / Sarah Franks
Dayton resident Wanda Lacy walks miles everyday in her South Park neighborhood home to stay active during quarantine. Staff photo / Sarah Franks

Call a loved one

Staying in touch with friends and family is more important than ever. Extra time indoors means that far-away cousin you’ve been missing has more time than ever to catch up.

Keeping an active social life, even through quick phone calls, can help maintain your mental health by keeping feelings of isolation at bay.

Make it an extra-special date with just a little planning. Schedule the call or video chat ahead of time, make it a Happy Hour call with wine or another quarantine cocktail or mocktail favorite, coordinate a board game that both parties can play at home or just engage in a little dress-up with an outfit that doesn’t consist of sweatpants and a T-shirt.

However it’s done, making the visit a priority can help bring a sense of normalcy to a not-normal year.

Tashel Bordere (second from right) and her wife, Dr. Kate Grossman (right) with their daughters Zaydie, 14, and Sage, 3, spoke with the kids' grandparents on both sides via Zoom video call at their home in Columbia, Mo. Instead of stilted, office-style Zoom sessions, families can use digital connections in creative ways to foster more meaningful relationships, experts say. Michael B. Thomas / The New York Times
Tashel Bordere (second from right) and her wife, Dr. Kate Grossman (right) with their daughters Zaydie, 14, and Sage, 3, spoke with the kids' grandparents on both sides via Zoom video call at their home in Columbia, Mo. Instead of stilted, office-style Zoom sessions, families can use digital connections in creative ways to foster more meaningful relationships, experts say. Michael B. Thomas / The New York Times

Credit: NYT

Credit: NYT

Try attending a virtual event

Many events, rather than being canceled altogether, have moved online in response to the pandemic, making them accessible to more people.

Use this stay-at-home time to explore local clubs or organizations that meet regularly online. For those who have been using the quarantine time to find a new passion such as writing, there are virtual events where people try their hand at sharing their work with others.

Attending an online event for the first time can be intimidating. But it requires less commitment than in-person events, and the only travel time required is the walk to the fridge for a refreshment.

To explore virtual events happening in coming months, just use Facebook’s “Discover” feature under the “Events” tab.

For example, TechFest Dayton’s 2021 festival is free, two-day festival happening virtually this year on Feb. 13-14. This event, typically held at Sinclair Community College, is an excellent educational opportunity for families and requires little to no planning to attend now that it’s gone virtual.

For more information, visit www.techfestdayton.org.

SICSA is offering holiday bundles making shopping easy. The "Comfy At Home" bundle features SICSA blend Boston Stoker coffee, a mugh, hot chocolate and a plush blanket for $25. CONTRIBUTED PHOTO
SICSA is offering holiday bundles making shopping easy. The "Comfy At Home" bundle features SICSA blend Boston Stoker coffee, a mugh, hot chocolate and a plush blanket for $25. CONTRIBUTED PHOTO

Retail therapy — from the couch

Treating yourself to a new outfit or toy is a temporary, but nevertheless comforting, indulgence that everyone deserves this year.

This pastime won’t only help the shopper unwind while finding a new treasure, it’s helpful to local businesses who need the support more than ever. Most local shops and boutiques have made it possible for customers to shop most of their collections in a fast and convenient manner at home.

Visit a your local shop’s website to check their online shopping options.

A rain drop hits a puddle in Greene County on Thursday, Oct. 29, 2020, as heavy rains from the Hurricane Zeta air mass soaked the area. MARSHALL GORBY\STAFF
A rain drop hits a puddle in Greene County on Thursday, Oct. 29, 2020, as heavy rains from the Hurricane Zeta air mass soaked the area. MARSHALL GORBY\STAFF

Credit:

Credit:

DO go outside

Kids grow up being told not to jump in puddles and to stay inside altogether when the weather is dark and gray.

However, in these unprecedented times, those rules were made for breaking.

Pulling up the ol’ rain boots and throwing on an extra jacket is all it’ll take to enjoy a walk in the rain or snow. Some brisk air to add a little pink to the cheeks can be a great way to re-energize while staying at or close to home during the pandemic.

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