National Afro-American Museum and Cultural Center reopens with new exhibit

The National Afro-American Museum & Cultural Center will reopen Saturday, May 15 with a new exhibition. “Rhythm of Revolution” maps the visual flow of artistic, cultural, social, and political change in America from 1619 to the present day. HADLEY DRODGE / NATIONAL AFRO-AMERICAN MUSEUM AND CULTURAL CENTER
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The National Afro-American Museum & Cultural Center will reopen Saturday, May 15 with a new exhibition. “Rhythm of Revolution” maps the visual flow of artistic, cultural, social, and political change in America from 1619 to the present day. HADLEY DRODGE / NATIONAL AFRO-AMERICAN MUSEUM AND CULTURAL CENTER

‘Rhythm of Revolution’ kicks off museum reopening Saturday, May 15

The National Afro-American Museum & Cultural Center will reopen Saturday, May 15 with a new exhibition.

“Rhythm of Revolution” maps the visual flow of artistic, cultural, social, and political change in America from 1619 to the present day.

The National Afro-American Museum & Cultural Center will reopen Saturday, May 15 with a new exhibition. “Rhythm of Revolution” maps the visual flow of artistic, cultural, social, and political change in America from 1619 to the present day. HADLEY DRODGE / NATIONAL AFRO-AMERICAN MUSEUM AND CULTURAL CENTER
Caption
The National Afro-American Museum & Cultural Center will reopen Saturday, May 15 with a new exhibition. “Rhythm of Revolution” maps the visual flow of artistic, cultural, social, and political change in America from 1619 to the present day. HADLEY DRODGE / NATIONAL AFRO-AMERICAN MUSEUM AND CULTURAL CENTER

Objects from the museum’s collection “tell the story of how African American and Black artists responded to contemporary challenges in our society and also how they shaped our culture going into the future,” Hadley Drodge, a curator at the museum, said.

A map of Africa from the 1700s the way it was envisioned by European colonists is part of the display as is a wedding dress made for Remithy Ward Hatcher, a Cincinnati woman who had been enslaved in the south.

ExploreNational Afro-American Museum and Cultural Center marks 30 years

Artwork is an important aspect of the exhibition because “artists are the movers and shapers of our culture,” Drodge said.

Paintings and photography, including an early photograph of a woman and child using the “crayon enlargement” technique, is among the artifacts on display.

The National Afro-American Museum & Cultural Center will reopen Saturday, May 15 with a new exhibition. “Rhythm of Revolution” maps the visual flow of artistic, cultural, social, and political change in America from 1619 to the present day. HADLEY DRODGE / NATIONAL AFRO-AMERICAN MUSEUM AND CULTURAL CENTER
Caption
The National Afro-American Museum & Cultural Center will reopen Saturday, May 15 with a new exhibition. “Rhythm of Revolution” maps the visual flow of artistic, cultural, social, and political change in America from 1619 to the present day. HADLEY DRODGE / NATIONAL AFRO-AMERICAN MUSEUM AND CULTURAL CENTER

This exhibit was created by the NAAMCC curators Rosa Rojas, Hadley Drodge and Derek Pridemore, who worked with Wright State University graduate students in public history. The students did the research, selected the collections objects and assisted with developing the exhibition.

The museum, at 1350 Brush Row Road in Wilberforce, has been closed since September 2020 due to the pandemic.

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Reopening hours beginning May 15 are 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Friday and Saturday, Beginning June 2 hours will be 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Wednesday through Saturday. Masks and social distancing are required.

Admission is $6 for adults, $5 for seniors and $3 for ages 6-17. Admission is free for Ohio history Connection and NAAMCC members.

“Rhythm of Revolution” will join other exhibitions on display at the museum.

The National Afro-American Musuem & Cultural Center is Wilberforce is marking 30 years with a new exhibit called Color Outside the Lines: Celebrating Thirty Years at NAAMCC. The museum also has another exhibit about African Americans civilian and military service during World War II called African Americans Fighting for a Double Victory. LISA POWELL / STAFF
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The National Afro-American Musuem & Cultural Center is Wilberforce is marking 30 years with a new exhibit called Color Outside the Lines: Celebrating Thirty Years at NAAMCC. The museum also has another exhibit about African Americans civilian and military service during World War II called African Americans Fighting for a Double Victory. LISA POWELL / STAFF

African Americans Fighting for a Double Victory

Explore the many ways that African Americans served the country in the military and on the home front during World War II through this exhibit of World War II materials from the NAAMCC collections. Explore stories of the Tuskegee Airmen, the Red Ball Express and Wilberforce-area veterans. Learn more about the Impact of African American World War II veterans had on the advances in Civil Rights that happened during and after the war.

Behind the Mask-Black Power in Comics

This exhibit explores African Americans’ painful and triumphant history in comic books. It delves into the history of Black comic book characters who, in the past, were rarely featured as heroes. Black comic book creators are now emerging to establishing superheroes of their own, reflecting a truer self-identity and cultural pride.

Queens of the Heartland

The Queens of the Heartland exhibit features the stories of 30 Ohio African American women who were a significant influence in the Suffrage and Civil Rights Movements from the 19th through the 21st centuries. The exhibit tells the stories of these change-makers through panel text and three-dimensional objects. This exhibit includes portrait illustrations of these historical figures by New York artist Nichole Washington, whose current work focuses on identity and celebrates African American women.

Queens of the Heartland, an exhibition highlighting the trailblazing accomplishments of 30 Black Ohio women, is on display at the National Afro-American Museum and Cultural Center in Wilberforce. LISA POWELL / STAFF
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Queens of the Heartland, an exhibition highlighting the trailblazing accomplishments of 30 Black Ohio women, is on display at the National Afro-American Museum and Cultural Center in Wilberforce. LISA POWELL / STAFF

Credit: LISA POWELL

Credit: LISA POWELL

What’s in Your Attic? Selections from Our Permanent Collection

When the National Afro-American Museum and Cultural Center (NAAMCC) opened its doors in 1988, it was in the vanguard by being one of the first national museums dedicated to African American history. Today, NAAMCC houses more than 8,000 artifacts, 600 linear feet of archived materials and remains a pioneer in preserving and presenting African American history and culture.

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