PATIO OF THE WEEK: Rip Rap Roadhouse a huge draw with expansive space

Celebrating summer and the uptick of outdoor dining, Dayton.com will spotlight restaurant patios across the Miami Valley on a weekly basis.

In April 2016 I wrote about the grand opening of Rip Rap Roadhouse, which had been purchased by Jason Wadzinski, a business savvy, charismatic guy who was able to see the potential in the building and land after a visit to the former Jackass Flats on one of its motorcycle nights.

After purchasing Jackass Flats, Wadzinski endeavored to give it a facelift with a new name.

The 160-year-old barn has been lovingly restored, a 1,000 square-foot commercial kitchen was added, and a 1950s-inspired, family-friendly restaurant was put in. Everywhere you look, every surface, floor, wall and fixture, has been thoughtfully updated with an ambiance that invites you to sit and enjoy. There’s no question if you had been here previously that this is a far, far cry from its shabby predecessor. The bathrooms are not even recognizable when you compare them to what was there before.

Restored Indian motorcycles including a 1937 Indian Junior Scout behind the main bar and a 1920 Indian Powerplus behind the restaurant bar are appointments that would make the American Pickers proud.

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During the summers, Rip Rap Roadhouse is a huge draw for motorcyclists across the Miami Valley looking for a large outdoor space and a place to park their bikes. It’s also right off the bike path for anyone searching for lunch.

Credit: Alexis Larsen

Credit: Alexis Larsen

The patio is expansive and seats more than 100 with tables that can accommodate larger parties. The restaurant has seating for 80 and the inside bar around 50.

There are 16 chilly beers on tap in the main bar to order up and enjoy on the patio. The bar does a solid job with any mixed drinks you can dream up.

The patio is partially covered with plenty of shade and has plenty of green space to look at once you get past the parking lot.

Credit: Alexis Larsen

Credit: Alexis Larsen

During the summer when the weather is nice, Rip Rap Roadhouse is an appealing stop to grab a sandwich and a cold drink. The patio and parking lot always offers some good people-watching with motorcyclists coming in and out. However, some crowds are rowdier than others and fair warning for parents or caregivers, most of the language I’ve heard there recently has not been kid-friendly.

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Also, Wednesday bike nights are definitely wild, so stay away mid-week if you are looking for something a little more sublime.

Credit: Contributed

Credit: Contributed

In addition, don’t forget to check out the Rip Rap Shake Shack. This soft serve ice cream store for families, many of whom are at the nearby soccer, baseball and football fields for games, is a highlight. The shack has its own large outdoor patio adorned with a number of picnic tables. If you haven’t had one of Rip Rap’s monster shakes, you are in for quite the towering treat.

Credit: Contributed

Credit: Contributed

Rip Rap Roadhouse has two very different types of patios that offer two very different types of experiences. Consider stopping by this summer for very, very different reasons.

Contact this contributing writer at alexis.e.larsen@hotmail.com.

HOW TO GO

What: Rip Rap Roadhouse

Where: 6024 Rip Rap Road, Dayton

Hours: 11 a.m. to 10 p.m. Tuesday through Thursday; 11 a.m. to midnight Friday, 9 a.m. to midnight Saturday; and 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. Sunday

More information: (937) 236-4329 or www.ripraproadhouse.com

Bike Nights: Wednesday Bike Nights at Rip Rap Roadhouse are one of the largest in Ohio and takes place over four to five hours. Bikers start rolling in at 4 p.m., a limited menu is available for order, live music kicks on at around 6:30 p.m. and by 8 p.m. more than 1,000 motorcycles will have filled up the parking lot and field. At around 8:30 p.m. you start seeing people take off and by 9:30 p.m. there are just a few folks left.

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