FEMA and FCC emergency alert test planned for today

FEMA and the FCC are scheduled to test the Emergency Alert System and Wireless Emergency Alerts on Wednesday, Aug. 11, 2021, at 2:20 p.m. Photo courtesy the National Weather Service

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FEMA and the FCC are scheduled to test the Emergency Alert System and Wireless Emergency Alerts on Wednesday, Aug. 11, 2021, at 2:20 p.m. Photo courtesy the National Weather Service

The Federal Communications Commission and Federal Emergency Management Agency are scheduled to test the emergency alert system test Wednesday afternoon.

The nationwide test will include texts for cell phone users who opted in for the alerts, as well as messages sent to TV and radios stations, according to the National Weather Service.

The test alert is scheduled to be sent at 2:20 p.m.

The Montgomery County Regional Dispatch Center reminded residents of the test and asked them not to call 911 regarding the nationwide test unless there is an actual emergency.

The purpose of the test is to check the effectiveness of the Emergency Alert System, according to FEMA. Information collected will be used to improve the EAS and Wireless Emergency Alerts.

The text message, which will only be sent to those who have opted to receive WEAs, may read, “THIS IS A TEST of the National Wireless Emergency Alert System. No action is needed.”

To opt-in to receive WEAs, follow the directions here.

According to FEMA, the test alert issued to TV stations may read, “A Primary Entry Point system has issued a National Periodic Test for all of the United States beginning at 2:20 PM and ending at 2:50 PM on AUG 11, 2021 (station ID).”

The EAS test message for radio stations will be about a minute long and may be said in English and Spanish. The message will say, “This is a test of the National Emergency Alert System. This system was developed by broadcast and cable operators in voluntary cooperation with the Federal Emergency Management Agency, the Federal Communications Commission and local authorities to keep you informed in the event of an emergency. If this had been an actual emergency an official message would have followed the tone alert you heard at the start of this message. No action is required.”

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