Psych!You won’t be able to tour Dayton Arcade after all

Credit: DaytonDailyNews

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The Dayton Arcade was built in 1904 and was a centerpiece of the city until 1991. It's been empty since but still remains a historic landmark and highlight of local architecture.

Credit: DaytonDailyNews

Sorry guys, you’ll likely need to scratch those plans of getting a rare look inside the Dayton Arcade.

>> 8 things you probably never knew about the Dayton Arcade

Young Ohio Preservationists, a state historic preservation group, said it underestimated the number of people would be interested in seeing inside the historic building in the center of downtown Dayton June 3.

>> Dayton Arcade is ‘show of good faith’ to partners, community, UD leader says 

More than 900 people expressed interest in a tour of the building for an event called “YOP Tour Day: Dayton Arcade.”

ExploreHere is a message on the event’s page:

"We want to extend our sincerest apologies to everyone disappointed that they can't make this particular tour. We're a very small volunteer organization not based in Dayton. We had no idea how overwhelming the interest would be. Additionally, a few tour guides had to drop out last minute, making the cap on attendance even more strict. The cap on this particular tour was set at 25, and with over 900 people vocalizing interest on our event page, we suppose this was the reason many people weren't able to get in. 

There will be additional tours in the future, and we will make sure you all know ahead of time including how many people are limited per tour with as much time to sign up as we can manage. We'll also be sure to post disclaimers that tour restrictions and times are subject to change, so that our attendees will be aware that their plans may be affected. 

Thank you for your understanding, and we hope you'll join us for our additional Arcade tours & future events."

>> MORE: The Arcade: Dayton’s crowning jewel

>> MORE: Photos of the Dayton Arcade

First opened in 1904, the Arcade closed for good in 1991.

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The architect who designed this building, Frank M. Andrews, later designed the Dayton Arcade. Andrews worked on plans for the Arcade under an art glass dome in his architect’s studio on the 13th floor of the building. DAYTON METRO LIBRARY / LUTZENBERGER PICTURE COLLECTION

The architect who designed this building, Frank M. Andrews, later designed the Dayton Arcade. Andrews worked on plans for the Arcade under an art glass dome in his architect’s studio on the 13th floor of the building. DAYTON METRO LIBRARY / LUTZENBERGER PICTURE COLLECTION

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The architect who designed this building, Frank M. Andrews, later designed the Dayton Arcade. Andrews worked on plans for the Arcade under an art glass dome in his architect’s studio on the 13th floor of the building. DAYTON METRO LIBRARY / LUTZENBERGER PICTURE COLLECTION

Credit: DaytonDailyNews

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The Dayton Arcade has sat empty and quiet for more than 25 years but may be on the cusp of a renaissance.Though deserted for two and a half decades, wandering through the silent buildings is still a marvelous and mysterious trip back in time.

Credit: DaytonDailyNews

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