TONIGHT: Dayton’s Oscar, Emmy-winning duo premieres their latest documentary on PBS

Yellow Springs residents and filmmaker duo Julia Reichert and Steven Bognar's new documentary, 9 to 5, will make its national debut on PBS tonight, Feb. 1, 2021. FILE
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Yellow Springs residents and filmmaker duo Julia Reichert and Steven Bognar's new documentary, 9 to 5, will make its national debut on PBS tonight, Feb. 1, 2021. FILE

The latest documentary from Dayton’s filmmaking powerhouse duo Steven Bognar and Julia Reichert will make its national debut tonight, Monday Feb. 1.

“9 To 5: The Story of a Movement” is scheduled to air at 10 p.m. Feb. 1 on PBS. For more information on watching the film and finding your local PBS listing, visit pbs.org.

ExploreQ&A: Dayton’s Oscar-winning duo talk about their next film ‘9 To 5’

The film, a full-length documentary, is about the fight for women’s equality in the U.S. workplace. It premiered in Dayton in October to a packed audience at Dixie Twin Drive-In.

“Last night far exceeded our hopes for what could happen during this pandemic,” said “9 To 5” directors Reichert and Bognar in a joint statement, following the local premiere. “Hundreds of people socially distanced on a warm summer-like night in late October, with a wonderful energy in the air. It was so much fun, kind of goofy to do it in the drive-in but also there was a magic to seeing that projector beam under the night sky and the stars. We are so grateful to everyone who came.”

Tonight, the film’s audience will be far broader.

ExploreThe true stories of Dayton’s own ‘9 to 5’ women

The “9 To 5” team spent nearly a decade following up on tips about people they should interview and stories they should explore, as well as digging through archives across the country and ultimately fine-tuning every last detail of the project.

“In the early 1970s, a group of secretaries in Boston decided that they had suffered in silence long enough,” wrote FilmDayton ahead of the local screening. “They started fighting back, creating a movement to force changes in their workplaces. This movement became national, and is a largely forgotten story of U.S. 20th-century history. It encapsulates a unique intersection of the women’s movement with the labor movement. The awareness these secretaries brought to bear on women’s work reverberates even today.”

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