Last chance to see thousands of blooming daffodils, a spring sight each year in Oakwood

Each year the hillside at 1911 Ridgeway Rd. comes alive with thousands of bright yellow daffodils.John C. Gray and his wife, Mj, started planting them in 2006. Today there are 160,000 daffodils on display each spring.  LISA POWELL / STAFF
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Each year the hillside at 1911 Ridgeway Rd. comes alive with thousands of bright yellow daffodils.John C. Gray and his wife, Mj, started planting them in 2006. Today there are 160,000 daffodils on display each spring. LISA POWELL / STAFF

There are still a few days left to catch a glimpse of a spectacular display of spring flowers in Oakwood.

Each year the hillside at 1911 Ridgeway Road comes alive with thousands of bright yellow daffodils.

Each year the hillside at 1911 Ridgeway Rd. comes alive with thousands of bright yellow daffodils.John C. Gray and his wife, Mj, started planting them in 2006. Today there are 160,000 daffodils on display each spring.  LISA POWELL / STAFF
Caption
Each year the hillside at 1911 Ridgeway Rd. comes alive with thousands of bright yellow daffodils.John C. Gray and his wife, Mj, started planting them in 2006. Today there are 160,000 daffodils on display each spring. LISA POWELL / STAFF

John C. Gray, the owner of the home surrounded by the glorious blooms, and his wife Mj, started planting “classic daffodils” in 2006.

“We started with just a few – maybe 10,000 – and we worked our way up to 160,000,” he said.

The daffodils bloomed about three weeks ago, Gray said, and are past their peak, but the expanse of fading blossoms and foliage among tall trees is still a sight.

John C. Gray and his wife Mj, have 160,000 daffodils planted at their home at 1911 Ridgeway Rd. in Oakwood. The daffodils bloom for nearly three weeks each spring and visitors flock to see the sight. CONTRIBUTED PHOTO / JOHN C. GRAY
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John C. Gray and his wife Mj, have 160,000 daffodils planted at their home at 1911 Ridgeway Rd. in Oakwood. The daffodils bloom for nearly three weeks each spring and visitors flock to see the sight. CONTRIBUTED PHOTO / JOHN C. GRAY

Each year visitors, armed with cameras, wander the pathways among the flowers to take photographs and wonder at the scene.

“We had no knowledge that it would be as big of a hit as it,” Gray said. “It’s a joy to see people out.”