Ranking: Dayton 41st fattest city in the U.S.

Consumer finance web site WalletHub ranks Dayton at No. 41 among the fattest cities in America.
Caption
Consumer finance web site WalletHub ranks Dayton at No. 41 among the fattest cities in America.

If a new ranking by a consumer advice web site is any indication, then Dayton, you’re too fat.

Dayton ranks 41st among the top 100 fattest cities in America, according to a ranking released by Wallet Hub Tuesday.

That makes it the fifth fattest city in the Buckeye State, according to WalletHub, behind the Youngstown metro area (ranked at 13), Canton (25), Columbus (28) and Toledo (32).

At the same time, the site ranked Dayton at 98, for having the “lowest percentage of overweight adults.”

RELATED: Poll: Half of overweight Americans aren't trying to lose weight

The overall ranking at No. 41 takes into account the number of obese and overweight adults, “fat prevalence,” the “healthy environment” and weight-related health problems, the site says.

RELATED: Research: Too much running may shorten your life

Said WalletHub: “This report takes a more holistic approach to problems related to weight by not only accounting for both ‘overweight’ and ‘obese’ residents but also including a total of 14 key metrics, ranging from ‘percentage of physically inactive adults’ to ‘percentage of adults eating fewer than one serving of fruits or vegetables per day.’”

RELATED: Meet Obi: Dayton-produced robot helping others enjoy mealtime

The web site says it compiled the list through data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, county health rankings, the U.S. Department of Agriculture Economic Research Service and other sources.

The fattest city on the list was Memphis, Tenn., which topped Shreveport-Bossier City, La. at No. 2 and the Indianapolis area at No. 3.

Citing the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, WalletHub says more than a third of American adults and about 17 percent of young people were obese in 2012.

“By one estimate, Americans spend up to $315.8 billion annually on obesity-related medical treatment, elevating health-care costs exponentially for obese adults and children compared with healthier individuals,” the site said.

You can see the ranking here.

About the Author