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UPDATE: Dayton answers the call to help motherless kittens

“The response has been unheard of”

Tiny, motherless kittens needed help, and the community answered. 

In the days since we first told you about a need for volunteers to bottle feed kittens, the Humane Society of Greater Dayton has five new fosters with two pending, and has sent 33 applications to people requesting to become a foster for an animal. 

A sudden wave of motherless kittens has prompted a call for human foster parents to bottle feed them. “When we get little babies that have been separated from their mothers, then we fill in as the mothers,” said Brian Weltge, the president and CEO of the Humane Society of Greater Dayton. LISA POWELL / STAFF

Typically, the organization may get one request for an application each week. 

“The response has been unheard of,” said Jessica Garringer, marketing and development project manager for the Humane Society of Greater Dayton. “We’ve had such a wonderful response from people. I’ve been here six years and haven’t seen anything like it.” 

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READ THE ORIGINAL STORY: Teeny, tiny furry ‘bottle babies’ will melt your heart - and they need your help

The organization put a call out for fosters in mid-August after they saw a sudden increase in orphaned kittens, some just days old, who needed to be fed and cared for. 

The organization provides foster training and pairs volunteers with mentors who are also caring for bottle baby kittens. Formula and supplies, crates and bedding, and medical care are all provided by the Humane Society of Greater Dayton. 

Not only have they seen marked interest in fostering “bottle babies,” but people are also interested in fostering older kittens and puppies. 

RELATED: Animal advocates for more than a century

“People don’t realize how much of a need we have for volunteers, especially fosters,” Garringer said. “Keeping these animals in your home for a few weeks frees up cages so we can help additional animals in our community. The foster program is critical to our overall success in helping save nearly 2,000 animals every year.”

WANT TO KNOW MORE ABOUT FOSTERING AN ANIMAL? 

The Humane Society of Greater Dayton has more information on their website, www.hsdayton.org/foster

For more information: (937) 262-5937 or foster@hsdayton.org

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