5 ways you can thank our health care workers right now

Kristen Earley, a nurse at the Clark County Combined Health District, gets a flu shot ready. BILL LACKEY/STAFF

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Kristen Earley, a nurse at the Clark County Combined Health District, gets a flu shot ready. BILL LACKEY/STAFF

If there’s a doctor or nurse in your life, you’re already aware that they work really long shifts. After seeing what health care workers are enduring in Italy, Spain and New York City due to the coronavirus, people are wondering how they can help.

People across the country are showing their appreciation for health care workers. Some of you may have seen a viral video that shows Atlanta residents applauding health care workers during a recent shift change.

Here are some simple ways you can thank and support health care workers locally and in those hardest hit areas.

👂 Thank them and listen

A simple “thank you” goes a long way. While they work long hours and don’t get enough rest, we don’t want the people caring for us to feel unappreciated, too. Even though you can’t say thank you in person, sending cards, messages and social media virtual hugs is a great place to start.

If someone close to you is a health care worker and they reach out to talk, be there for them and listen. This is when they need a support system the most!

>> Coronavirus: Send an e-card to Dayton's Children's Hospital patients

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Boston Stoker: Starting in 1973 as a cigar store that offered free coffee to customers, Boston Stoker has evolved over the years into Dayton’s premier coffee brand. In fact, they roast more than 150,000 pounds of coffee each year. (Source: Facebook)

Boston Stoker: Starting in 1973 as a cigar store that offered free coffee to customers, Boston Stoker has evolved over the years into Dayton’s premier coffee brand. In fact, they roast more than 150,000 pounds of coffee each year. (Source: Facebook)

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Boston Stoker: Starting in 1973 as a cigar store that offered free coffee to customers, Boston Stoker has evolved over the years into Dayton’s premier coffee brand. In fact, they roast more than 150,000 pounds of coffee each year. (Source: Facebook)

☕ Buy them coffee 

Dayton Real Estate Crush has introduced "Pay it forward: Joe to Go for our front line workers." Purchase a "Joe to Go" and they'll deliver it to nurses, doctors, emergency workers, and others on the front lines. Additionally, the company will match a Joe to Go for every one purchased.

Love this idea!

🛍️ Offer to drop off food, groceries or other essentials

As the number of coronavirus cases start to grow locally, the hours, stress and burden on emergency workers will also grow. Having time to shop or cook is going to be increasingly difficult.

If you have a family member, friend or neighbor who is a health care worker, send them a message and see if they need anything from the store the next time you’re there, and drop off at their door.

You can take a step further and offer to cook a nutritious meal, or order them delivery.

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People in the area are responding to a plea by the Community Blood Center to join the effort to help prevent a regional blood shortage during the coronavirus pandemic. PHOTO: Jim Noelker

People in the area are responding to a plea by the Community Blood Center to join the effort to help prevent a regional blood shortage during the coronavirus pandemic. PHOTO:  Jim Noelker

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People in the area are responding to a plea by the Community Blood Center to join the effort to help prevent a regional blood shortage during the coronavirus pandemic. PHOTO: Jim Noelker

🆎 Donate blood

Hospitals are still in need of blood, and due to the virus, many blood drives have been canceled. Under the stay home order, you are still allowed to leave your home to donate blood.

The Community Blood Center is urging donors to make an appointment to donate to maintain a safe environment. Spacing donors through appointments maintains social distancing by reducing wait time and congregating. Make an appointment online at www.DonorTime.com or by calling (937) 461-3220.

>> Coronavirus: Local blood bank says it's safe to donate blood

😷 Donate Personal Protection Equipment

If you or your company has stored Personal Protection Equipment (masks, gowns, face shields, goggles, etc), please consider donating to the front-line workers who need them the most. Many hospitals are running on a limited supply, so workers are dangerously reusing PPE, or using trash bags and other unconventional methods in a pinch.

For individuals with a small supply of masks, visit Mask Match, a peer-to-peer platform helping people with spare N95 and surgical masks send them directly to health care workers on the front lines who need them — without leaving their house. Visit www.mask-match.com if you are willing to donate or if you are a health care worker in need of masks.

For companies, suppliers and individuals with larger supplies, visit Get Us PPE to find out where the need is the greatest. They will leverage their volunteer network to get your donations to a local hospital.

>> Want to donate homemade face masks? Here's how to help.

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